Before I die, I want to be nonspinning for a period of time.

  • 1
  • Do you have a threshold of “stasis” in mind? For example, the Sun’s surface rotates about once per month. But late in its life, the Sun will shed most of its mass as a planetary nebula. That enormous nebula will contain the same angular momentum that the Sun does, but its actual rotation period might be longer than the time it takes to orbit the galaxy’s center.
  • rob
  • Aug 7 at 11:13
  • @rob Good question. I have edited the question accordingly.
  • Matthew Christopher Bartsh
  • Aug 7 at 12:12
  • 1
  • I take issue with your statement that lasers cannot occur naturally. Lasing occurs naturally in the radio spectrum. (The relationship between the names “laser” and “maser” is too complex for a comment.) There is currently no evidence for natural optical lasers, but the totalitarian principle suggests they probably occur as well.
  • rob
  • Aug 7 at 14:31
  • @rob That’s fascinating. I have edited the question accordingly. Thanks.
  • Matthew Christopher Bartsh
  • Aug 7 at 14:59
  • @rob Would the Sun nebula be likely to be rotating slower than the MWG? Was there any loss of angular momentum by the nebula that the sun formed from, or from the sun after it formed? About how big would the Sun nebula be when its rotation equaled that of the MWG after the explosion?
  • Matthew Christopher Bartsh
  • Aug 10 at 9:34
  • The Sun doesn’t/won’t explode. A planetary nebula is not non-rotating because it is subject to all sorts of torques, not least tidal torquing in the potential gradient of the Galaxy once it becomes large.
  • ProfRob
  • Aug 10 at 10:13
  • @ProfRob If a star is making one turn per thirty days and sheds a planetary nebula, the nebula would rotate slower and slower as it expanded until torquing caused it to start rotating faster. What would be the minimum rate of rotation, and about how big would the nebula be at that time, and how long after shedding would that be?
  • Matthew Christopher Bartsh
  • Aug 10 at 12:10
  • @ProfRob What if the nebula was shed by a star far from any galaxy, and far from any other large masses? The star might be expected to be rotating slower when it sheds the nebula, and the nebula would be able to get very big w/o getting torqued or bent out of shape. I wonder what its slowest rate of rotation might be?
  • Matthew Christopher Bartsh
  • Aug 10 at 12:38

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Matthew Christopher Bartsh

Matthew Christopher Bartsh

I always follow back. I usually follow anyone who makes an interesting or okay response to one my articles. I often clap. I never give fewer than fifty claps.